Bertha’s story – Lashaine Village, Tanzania

Rotary Club of Geraldton, and Rotary E-Club of D9700, are raising funds for a BUS for Orkeeswa Secondary School. A bus helps keep girls safe on their long journey to school, and enables them to participate in extra-curricular activities, and after-school programs for sport, study and development. Watch & share Bertha’s beautiful story of how education for girls benefits a whole community.

President’s Comment – 16 July 2017

Club Logo - Transparent

Thank you to all Attending last week’s Changeover Meeting 

I believe that it was a successful evening that we as a Club can build upon. Let us start with the planning this Tuesday, 18th July 2017 at 7.00pm

I cannot attend the meeting scheduled for Wednesday so we will try for Tuesday.

Please try to attend if you can.

Rotary President-elect Sam F. Owori dies

Rotary International President-elect Sam F. Owori died unexpectedly on 13 July due to complications from surgery. Sam was a member of the Rotary Club Kampala, Uganda, for 38 years.

Rotary President-elect Sam F. Owori died Thursday.

 “Rotary has become a way of life for me – with the intrinsic value and core belief in mutual responsibility and concern for one another as a cornerstone,” Sam said when he was nominated last year. “I feel immense satisfaction knowing that through Rotary, I’ve helped someone live better.”

Sam’s term as Rotary’s 108th president would have begun on 1 July 2018.

“Please remember Sam as the outstanding, hard-working Rotarian he was,” said Rotary International President Ian Riseley. “In this difficult time, I ask you to keep his wife, Norah, the Owori family and Sam’s millions of friends around the world in your thoughts.”

Under Sam’s leadership, the number of clubs in Uganda swelled from nine to 89 over the course of 29 years. 

Sam saw in Rotary members “an incredible passion to make a difference,” and wanted to “harness that enthusiasm and pride so that every project becomes the engine of peace and prosperity.”

Sam was the chief executive officer of the Institute of Corporate Governance of Uganda, whose mission is to promote excellence in corporate governance principles and practice in the region by 2020. Previously, he was executive director of the African Development Bank and managing director of Uganda Commercial Bank Ltd., and director of Uganda Development Bank.  He has also served as corporation secretary of the Central Bank of Uganda.

He served as member and chair of several boards including FAULU (U) Ltd., (now Opportunity Bank), the Uganda Heart Institute, the Centre for African Family Studies, Mulago Hospital Complex, Mukono Theological College, and the Kampala City Council.

Sam also was the currently vice-chair of the Hospice Africa Uganda, and member of the board and chair of the Audit Committee of PACE (Programme for Accessible Health, Communication and Education) in Uganda.

“Sam was a special person in so many ways, and his unexpected death is a huge loss to Rotary, his community and the world,” Riseley said. “In addition, we are establishing details on plans to celebrate his life as they become available.” 

Rotary is establishing a memorial fund in Sam’s honor and will provide further details soon.

3 tips for using social media to create a buzz

Evan Burrell using social media to create a buzz

By Evan Burrell, Rotary Club of Turramurra, New South Wales, Australia

I’m sure your club puts a lot of effort into planning events like fundraising dinners, charity golf days, car shows, and changeovers ceremonies. You probably focus right down to the smallest detail. So why not put that much effort into promoting your event on social media?

Social media is a powerful tool for gaining exposure. But just like all the other necessary arrangements, getting good results takes a bit of preparation. Here are three tips for developing a social media strategy for your next event.

  1. Create one unified hashtag for use across all social channels

By using an event-specific hashtag, you’ll make it easy for people to find not only what you’re sharing, but what other people are saying, too!

Recently, at the 2017 Rotary International Convention in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, the hashtag #Rotary17 allowed attendees to participate in an engaging conversation with fellow attendees and to see what everyone else was up to just by clicking the hashtag.

  1. Share visual content

A lot of work goes into pulling off a fantastic event. Capture that effort with photos and share it, so people can see how you’re pulling everything together. Posting photos and videos is a great way to generate some buzz and boost engagement.

  1. Get everyone involved with it

Think about all the people who will be there as part of the event and pull them into the conversation. For example, if you’re running a food and wine festival, include the stallholders and vendors in your posts and get them to post. If it’s a district conference, engage the speakers and sponsors, and even event staff.

Tell attendees to tweet and post about the event using your event-specific hashtag. Every little bit helps when it comes to getting the exposure your event deserves.

The beauty of social media is that it is a conversation, so let’s keep talking about Rotary!

Learn about Rotary International’s social media presence

President’s Comment – 9 Jul 17

Changeover Meeting – THIS Wednesday 12th July on Gotomeeting at 7.00pm

Can we have a full attendance at this meeting please as we will have a number of guests including the past, current and next District Governors and our Assistant Governor joining us. If you do not receive an email from me with the link to attend please contact me by phone 0407940014  or email – johnroberson1950@gmail.com

You should receive an email by Tuesday 11th am with the link to the GoToMeeting. I will be online at 6.30pm Wednesday 12th so that we can get the connections set up well.

 

This is great story:

Strength in Diversity

Muslim and Christian women work together to prevent dengue fever in Indonesia

In a world where intolerance and violence fueled by religious differences are seemingly increasing, one Rotary club in Indonesia is showing how diversity can help prevent a pandemic threat.

When the Rotary Club of Solo Kartini in Surakarta, Indonesia, formed 25 years ago, its members drew criticism from the predominantly Muslim community.

The club’s members were mostly Christians, atypical for a country where more than 80 percent of the population is Muslim. Religious leaders were skeptical of Rotary’s secular mission and wary of intrusion.

Undeterred, the club started recruiting more members. Today, the 72-member, all-female club includes both Muslims and Christians. 

And the effort they have put into breaking down barriers and fostering respect and understanding among club members has reinforced the club’s capacity to address dengue fever, one of the biggest public health threats in tropical cities like Surakarta.

Dengue fever is a virus transmitted by mosquitos that flourish in tropical urban environments like Surakarta. There is no effective treatment; once infected, victims experience sudden high fevers, severe headaches, joint and muscle pain, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting.

Launching an effective public health initiative to prevent the disease requires volunteers with deep knowledge and connections to the community who can craft specific and sustainable solutions. And that means being able to build relationships across religious, cultural and socio-economic lines.  

The Rotary Club of Solo Kartini in Surakarta, Indonesia, installed white tiles on more than 3,500 tubs. The tiles make it easier to see and clean mosquito larvae, which helps prevent dengue fever.

Photos by Tim Deagle

 
 

Rotary member Mariam Kartonagoro says her club’s diverse makeup – particularly its abundance of mothers and professionals of varied ages and backgrounds – enhances their effort to fight dengue fever. “The fact that we are different does not create trouble, but it strengthens our relationship,” she says.

In collaboration with the Rotary Club of Westport, Connecticut, USA, and the local ministry of health in Surakarta, the Muslim and Christian club members have been able to help reduce the risk for dengue fever by interrupting the breeding cycles of carrier mosquitos. 

The first step was to implement a startlingly simple, low-cost strategy: line the dark cement bathtubs, common in Indonesian households, with white tiles so mosquito larvae is easier to see – and remove. In five years, the club project modified more than 3,500 tubs in two neighborhoods.

But tiles weren’t enough. The club needed to change habits and behaviors that contribute to infections, which required building trust to educate the community.

“Our main focus is to educate and invite people to be aware of health issues, hygiene, and the importance of a clean environment,” says Rotarian Indrijani Sutapa, one of the dengue project leads. “This takes a very long time to teach.” 

Community social workers teach homeowners how to empty and scrub infested tubs twice a week, close the lid on water containers, and bury waste that can collect water.

The fact that we are different does not create trouble, but it strengthens our relationship.

Mariam Kartonagoro
Rotary Club of Solo Kartini in Surakarta, Indonesia

Siti Wahyuningsih, Surakarta’s director of public health, hopes to extend Rotary’s white-tile project to other parts of the city. 

“Health is a shared responsibility between government, society, and the private sector,” she says. “The government can’t do it alone. We as a community must embrace all of our strengths, and Rotary is a big one.”

The club hopes to see more people crossing cultural lines to help each other.

“Rotary has a very diverse membership, and we can be examples to others in the way we work. After all, when we give help, we do not ask about the religion of the person whose tub we replace. We think in a much more global way,” says Rotarian Febri Dipokusumo. “And we try to foster relationships with people who may have different beliefs or thoughts. We can become friends here in Rotary. Maybe this way, we can inspire Indonesia and the world.”